Andrè Schuen © Angelika Schwarz

Andrè Schuen & Ganes

In “their” Lied.Lab, the entire Schuen family takes their audience back to what is probably the earliest known form of vocal music. Since time immemorial, the family has cultivated the tradition of singing songs in the fascinating ancient language of the area they come from: Dolomite Ladin. After they had completed their studies at the Salzburg Mozarteum and the Richard Strauss Conservatory in Munich, this love of vocal music was the deciding factor prompting Marlene, Elisabeth and Andrè Schuen to embark on a musical career. At their Lied.Lab concert they will be joined by their cousin Maria Moling, with whom they appear in the pop formation “Ganes”. Accompanied in the duo songs by pianist Daniel Heide and seconded by their parents Paul and Hilda, they will be presenting an unusually wide variety of genres, ranging from folk songs and classical Lieder to jazz vocals and ethno-pop.

In cooperation with halle02 Heidelberg

 

Jörg Tröger in an interview with Andrè Schuen

Andrè Schuen © Angelika Schwarz

 

 

Andrè Schuen © Angelika Schwarz

Andrè Schuen & Daniel Heide

Spiritual anguish is often the germ from which great works are born. Nowhere is this bizarre fact better expressed than in the finale of Offenbach’s opera “The Tales of Hoffmann”: “Smile away the pain! The muse will assuage your grief. Love gives us stature, but sorrow ennobles us even more.” The young baritone Andrè Schuen has been impressing audiences as a singer and a stage presence for a number of years now. With his piano partner Daniel Heide he presents masterly song settings revolving around anguish and derangement or, as in the case of Schumann’s “Liederkreis” op. 24, actually having their origins in such an affliction.

In cooperation with Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg

Jörg Tröger in an interview with Andrè Schuen

Andrè Schuen © Angelika Schwarz

Sebastian Seitz © Stutte

Maximilian Krummen & Sebastian Seitz

A young man embarking on the long journey through life resolves to find out its deeper meaning. The conclusion he comes to is that the quintessence of all his striving is the quest for love. In the literature and music of Romanticism and the Lied as the place where they meet, love is the most frequently sung theme of our earthly existence. Alongside the consummate artistry of these songs we also have the earthier folksongs, in which the desire for love is expressed perhaps more simply and directly. Operating in the field of tension extending between these two poles, the first Lied.Lab of the festival juxtaposes folk-song arrangements with echoes of the folksong in the Lied and other “crossover” phenomena, for example in Beethoven’s arrangements of folksongs for piano trio and in the songs of the American composer Charles Ives.

In cooperation with Frauenbad Heidelberg

 

Jörg Tröger in an interview with Sebastian Seitz

Sebastian Seitz © Stutte

Tamara Banješević

Tamara Banješević

Tamara Banješević  is a Serbian soprano currently living and working in Germany. Since season 12/13, Tamara Banješević is a part of the ensemble of the National Theater in Mannheim. There she can be heard as Ännchen in Der Freischütz, Nannetta in Falstaff, Giulia in Rossini’s La Scala di Seta, Pamina in Magic Flute for children, Tebaldo and Voce dal cielo in Don Carlo, Frasquita in Carmen, or as Ninetta in Prokofiev’s The Love for Three Oranges. At the 2013 Easter Festival in Baden-Baden, Tamara made her very successful debut as a wicked sister Maguelone in P. Viardots Salon Opera Cendrillon, accompanied by members of Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra and in 2015 she will be returning to the famous festival as a Milliner in “Der Rosenkavalier”, conducted by Sir Simon Rattle, directed by Brigitte Fassbaender and accompanied by Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra. In summer 2014 she will be joining the Mozart Residency at the Aix en Provence Festival in France.
While still a student at the university, she gave a number of highly praised performances such as Barbarina in “Le nozze di Figaro” with GMD Dan Ettinger and Sand/Dewman in Humperdinckt’s “Hansel and Gretel” at the National Theater Mannheim, Susanna in “Le Nozze di Figaro” at E. T. A. Hoffmann Theater Bamberg; Anna Reich ”Die lustigen Weiber von Windsor” at Schloss Weikersheim under the baton of Peter Kuhn, and direction of Jakob Peters-Messer.
This young soprano has had the opportunity to gain concert experience at the venues like the Liederhalle Stuttgart and Beethovenhalle Bonn while performing R. Schumann’s Faust Scenes at the Internationale Bachakademie Stuttgart with maestro Helmuth Rilling and the SWR Orchestra Stuttgart; Heidelberger Frühling Festival, Opera d’Avignon and in 2014 at the Joseph Keilberth Saal – Konzerthaus Bamberg and Mozart Saal – Rosengarten Mannheim.
In her native Serbia, Tamara Banješević was rewarded with eight First Prizes in Serbian National Singing Competitions. In 2012 she won the First Prize at the 24th International Singing Competition in Marmande, France, as well as the Second Prize at the International Singing Competition of Opera Academy Baden-Baden and was a finalist at the 49th International Singing Competition in Toulouse, France.
Tamara Banješević holds a bachelor degree in music from the University of Music in Mannheim, Germany. Her talents are further honed in master classes given by Margreet Honig, Angelika Kirchschlager, Helen Donath, Thomas Hampson, Rudolf Piernay, Thomas Quasthoff and Wolfram Rieger and was a recipient of many awards including DAAD, Rotary Club, Lions Club, Bruno-Frey-Stiftung and the scholarship to participate in the Lied Academy of the International Music Festival Heidelberger Frühling.

Christina Pluhar © Marco Borggreve

Christina Pluhar & L‘Arpeggiata

“Music for a while shall all your cares beguile”. Has there ever been a more eloquent tribute to the salutary power of music than Purcell’s setting of these verses by John Dryden? Purcell was very much at home in London’s theatres, whose declared aim was to magic their audiences away into other (and better) worlds. For plays typically combining dance, song and the spoken word, Purcell wrote countless songs and incidental scores of bewitching beauty. With “Music for a While”, Christina Pluhar and her L’Arpeggiata ensemble have devised a homage to this late-17th century Orpheus britannicus, assembling early music specialists and jazz performers for the purpose and thus carrying on very much in Purcell’s liberal theatrical tradition. May the “while” be a very long one!

“Zugabe” Jörg Tröger in conversation with Christina Pluhar

Hanna Elisabeth Müller © Chris Gonz

Hanna-Elisabeth Müller & Juliane Ruf

Dazzled by Richard Strauss’ magnificent operas, one is sometimes tempted to lose sight of the fact that he is also one of the great Lied composers. In the course of his life he penned no fewer than 200 of these small-scale masterpieces. Alban Berg’s “Seven Early Songs” are an intriguingly ambivalent works, oscillating between his admiration for Strauss and the ideas of his teacher Arnold Schoenberg. To the ears of his contemporaries, Mussorgsky’s “Nursery” cycle must have sounded primitive and awkward, but the “wrong-note” harmonies were an intentional side-effect of his highly original musical idiom. Hanna-Elisabeth Müller’s “nursery” as a Lied singer was Thomas Hampson’s master-class at the 2009 Frühling. She is now a member of the Bavarian State Opera ensemble and in 2014 made her much-acclaimed debut in Arabella at the Salzburg Festival.

Hanna-Elisabeth Müller is
SWR2 New Talent

 

In cooperation with Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg

Special thanks to
Freundeskreis Heidelberger Frühling

 

 

Jörg Tröger in an interview with Hanna-Elisabeth Müller

Hanna-Elisabeth Müller © Chris Gonz

Thomas Hampson © Kristin Hoebermann

Thomas Hampson & The Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen

“Serious” music in the United States was long defined solely by the musical traditions of Europe. Gradually, however, the ethnic and cultural diversity of the inhabitants asserted themselves and specifically “American” idioms began to emerge. These range from Samuel Barber’s “Serenade for Strings”, composed when he was only 18, and Aaron Copland’s celebration of the first settlers in his ballet “Appalachian Spring” with its folksong reminiscences to Leonard Bernstein’s exuberant overture to “Candide”. Thomas Hampson, who for many years has so greatly enriched the Frühling both musically and personally, presents a work written for him in 2009 by Michael Daugherty: “Letters from Lincoln”, a musical homage to the famous president and champion of the abolition of slavery.

Special thanks to
Freundeskreis Heidelberger Frühling

 

 

The concert will be recorded by
Deutschlandradio Kultur

 

Broadcast: 6 April 15 8:03pm Deutschlandradio Kultur

Ian Bostridge © Benjamin Ealovega

Ian Bostridge & Julius Drake

“Winterreise”, “Die schöne Müllerin”, “Schwanengesang”. Usually it’s the big Schubert song cycles that we get to hear in the concert hall, making it easy to forget for a moment that the composer wrote some 600 other songs besides. Tenor Ian Bostridge, internationally famed for his Schubert interpretations, has delved into this treasure trove and come up not only with hardy perennials but also a variety of little-known gems from the period 1816 to 1827 that impressively illustrate the way in which Lied composition was a constant component in Schubert’s creative life. With its history as a locus of Romanticism, song and poetry, Heidelberg is uniquely qualified to offer these treasures a forum and enable the festival audiences to immerse themselves in Schubert’s universe.

Ian Bostridge © Benjamin Ealovega

Ian Bostridge

Ian Bostridge’s international recital career has taken him to the Munich, Vienna and Schwarzenberg Schubertiade Festivals and to the main stages of Carnegie Hall and La Scala, Milan. He has held artistic residencies including a Carte-Blanche series with Thomas Quasthoff at the Amsterdam Concertgebouw (2004/2005), a Perspectives series at Carnegie Hall, the Wigmore Hall and Hamburg Laeiszhalle. His recordings have won all the major international record prizes and been nominated for 13 Grammys. Recent recording include ‘Three Baroque Tenors’ with the English Concert and Bernard Labadie, and Britten songs with Antonio Pappano for EMI. He has worked with et al. the Berlin Philharmonic, Chicago Symphony, BBC Symphony and Los Angeles Philharmonic orchestras.

His operatic appearances have included Lysander (‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’) for Opera Australia at the Edinburgh Festival and Tamino (‘Die Zauberflöte’). Current and future plans include visits to several festivals as well as a recital tour of the United States.
In 2003 Ian Bostridge was made an Honorary Doctor of Music by the University of St Andrew’s and in 2010 he was made an honorary fellow of St John’s College Oxford. He will be Humanitas Professor of Classical Music at the University of Oxford 2014/2015.